GENESIS OF THE TRUMP FACTOR

It’s interesting and mildly amusing to read the litany of opinions bemoaning the rise of the Donald as the standard bearer of the Republican Party. I’m as horrified as the next person that a candidate that embraces hate and division as the source of greatness of the American character is the one whose message is resonating with a large segment of the body politic.

There’s no lack of theories about how we got here. They range from a public angry with the greed of Wall Street that has robbed the middle class of its wealth, to a government in Washington that does not work, to a morally weak group of Republican candidates for the presidency, unwilling to take on the Donald and be forced to endure the scathing personal attacks that he substitutes for substantive policy debate.

All of these critiques have some merit, but there’s one factor that is being overlooked because in my opinion, it indicts so many of those now heaping coals on the Donald.

The fact is that ever since the election and inauguration of President Obama there has been a virulent strain of racism in the charged atmosphere of the opposition to him from all sectors of the Republican Party. No doubt many will deny that this was the basis of their animus towards Mr. Obama. It was his policies they will insist. But to those of us minorities long accustomed to the latent racism still present in the American lifeblood, as well as many of the unbiased observers in the majority community, there is no doubt that ever since this black man became President of the country, a license of acceptance was granted to those opposing him on open and thinly veiled racist arguments.

The disrespect heaped on him by both public and private figures, the vilification of everything about him from his birth, to his integrity for no other than personal dislike and hate of the man caused a groundswell among those on the far right. Hate groups have grown at an alarming rate, and there is no end to the most ridiculous of conspiracy theories about his motives to seize power and destroy the constitutional rights of the white citizens of this country.

Rather than disassociate themselves from this noxious bigotry the denizens of the Republican Party, including several of the candidates for the presidency, fanned these flames for their own political gain, and the division in the country is arguably at its worst since the Civil War period.

Into this putrid soup of discontent came the Donald to take the lid off the bowl and stir the pot even more by validating unequivocally the hatred and bigotry that many in the mainstream had exploited while pretending that they were engaging in serious policy debate. The Donald has openly engaged the lowest common denominator of our fears and taken the largest step in setting this country back in its march towards a more perfect union for all.

There is still time to stop his march, still time for us to realize the serious threat this brand of hate filled politics poses to our national interest. There is still hope that whether or not he is the Republican nominee a democrat will win the general election. (My preference of course) But even so there will be need for all of us to work doubly hard to push back against the rise of outspoken bigotry and hate that will remain after the hoped for failure of his candidacy.

To Republicans and Democrats alike who believe that we are all Americans first, and allegiance to party is about a real conviction in choosing a different path to arrive at the same destination of a better society for us all, our work is just beginning and we will have to be committed to it not for an election cycle but for a very long time to come.

New Voter Restrictions Discouraging Votes in Several States

Washington DC – Election Day voting was beset with problems impacting voters in minority communities across the country reported the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law and Election Protection (Coalition) from Washington, DC. “These are the most unfair and confusing election procedures in the last 50 years … and come as no surprise in the first election since the U.S. Supreme Court case in Shelby County v Holder,” said Wade Henderson, President and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, the nation’s premier human rights commission. “In a massive manipulation (since Shelby) to make it harder to vote 14 states have made changes to their voting laws, and (the Coalition) has no idea on how many counties have done so.”

http://gbmnews.com/wp/archives/12784  for complete article

OBAMA’S INITIATIVE FOR MINORITY BOYS: Nice Shot but it Misses the Mark

I applaud the President’s efforts to engage the private sector and government in his initiative, to create more opportunities for young minority men and to improve conditions that keep them impoverished and imprisoned in disproportionate numbers.

However, its tepid rollout reflects the political reality of his limitations and that is part of the problem. There is no doubt this will help. The tragedy is that this is the signature assistance for the nation’s minority youth from our president.

This is not principally his fault. He is a victim of the same institutional racism that keeps people poor by failing to provide resources of opportunity through better health care, education, and jobs that pay a living wage.

Saddled with an historic recession, and vulnerable to criticism of being a president only for black people, he has been excruciatingly cautious about issues of race. His naiveté to the virulence of the racism he would encounter, that remains dedicated to destroying his presidency, made him avoid these issues in the hope he could broker progress by reaching across the aisle to find common ground.

He found no willing hand. He might as well have played to his base and stood firm on issues regarding equal access to resources and opportunity.

The fundamental problem in this country is that for the last 34 years since the Reagan presidency, when greed became good, the distribution of wealth has become increasingly more unequal.

Today, the top 1% of Americans own 42% of the financial wealth. The top 5%, meanwhile, own nearly 70%. The bottom 80% owns 7%. CEO pay is now 350X the average worker’s, up from 50X from 1960-1985. http://www.businessinsider.com/what-wall-street-protesters-are-so-angry-about-2011-10?op=1#ixzz2vhcPw2w7

The US has the highest income inequality among developed countries, and is the only one where the income gap is getting wider and not smaller. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/15/income-inequality-wall-street_n_3762422.html

The problem is the economic system, and the social underpinning it receives from social institutions, that has conjured acceptance of the status quo from the masses. Our economic system and the institutions that support it were created to benefit a specific class of people. That system remains in place today, and has been strengthened by laws that validate disproportionate access to government to wealthy people.

We accept the enduring myth that people are poor because they are lazy. This is often heard in the more benign but no less vulgar assertion that poor people should pull themselves up by their bootstraps. There are poor people for many reasons, but the prime reason is they are not valued. Their labor is cheap and their earnings are exploited.

The solution to this is multi-faceted, but one obvious place to begin is to get money out of politics. It won’t be easy, but it can be done. The plight of minorities is inextricably linked to the plight of poor people in general.

In America, as Watergate taught us, sadly, the answer to any question is nearly always, “Follow the Money.”